DPhil students




photo of Daniel Alati

Daniel Alati
DPhil Law

St Anne's College

Research interests: International Law; European Human Rights Law; Comparative anti-terrorism policy; Global Politics and Law; Secret evidence and closed material

Daniel Alati was born and raised in Toronto, and attended the University of Toronto from 2004 to 2009, receiving his Honours B.A. and M.A.in Criminology during that time. Daniel then decided to attend Osgoode Hall Law School in order to further pursue the criminological and international law issues he had developed a passion for in his previous studies. His L.L.M. thesis, entitled 'Responding to Global Problems Locally: Understanding and Evaluating Canada's Domestic Response to Terrorism', analyzed Canada's response to terrorism in comparison to that of the international community in order to gain a better understanding of the process whereby states develop and implement domestic measures that are cognizant of both their international obligations and domestic realities. There are several research topics that Daniel has explored during his time at Oxford, including: comparative anti-terrorism policy; public international law and european human rights law; secret evidence and national security. Daniel is interested in a number of future career paths outside of an academic career, including doing research for or working in a variety of international agencies, such as Interpol or the United Nations. Outside of academics, Daniel has many other passions in life, including travel, volunteer work and fine dining. He has traveled large parts of Canada, Europe and the Caribbean and one day hopes to be able to say he has seen every continent in the world. In Canada, Daniel developed solid relationships working in a high-end restaurant for over six years and volunteering with a young man through a youth mentoring service. Although it was difficult to leave those relationships behind, Daniel has thoroughly enjoyed the new challenges and experiences that life in Oxford has, and will continue to, provide.



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Alex Chung
DPhil Law

Linacre College


Alex Chung Alex Shang Huan Chung came to the Centre in 2005 to read for the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice. His dissertation was entitled ?The Impact of Mandatory Minimum Sentences on the Volume of Firearm-related Serious Crime in Canada.? Alex transferred to the MPhil in Criminology in 2006, and upon completion of the thesis the subsequent year, he returned to the Centre to begin his DPhil under the supervision of Professor Federico Varese. Building upon his MPhil study, his doctoral thesis examines the activities and structure of ethnic-Chinese criminals known as the ?Big Circle Boys?. Based mainly on first-hand data derived from court documents and interviews with relevant parties, his thesis addresses three issues in relation to the Big Circle Boys: their typological classification according to analytic definitions of criminal entities; the extent to which their reputation is maintained as a socially constructed label; and how organisational and operational changes have occurred over time and what these represent. Alex holds a BSc (Hons) in Physical Anthropology from the University of Toronto as well as an MSc in Forensic Archaeology from Bournemouth University. His research interests include the following areas: organised crime, Asian/ Chinese criminal groups, triads, mafias.



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Kristi Cooper
DPhil Law

St Hugh's College


Kristi Cooper worked for a number of years as an Electorate Officer for an Independent MLA of the Parliament of New South Wales, researching policing and drug matters, after completing a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Sydney, Australia.

Kristi then completed a Bachelor of Laws at the University of Sydney, after graduation in 2005 joining the Attorney General's Department of New South Wales, working first within the Criminal Practice Group of the Crown Solicitor's Office and then in the Criminal Division of the NSW District Court.

In 2006 Kristi was appointed Chief Researcher to the Justices of the New South Wales Court of Appeal, Supreme Court of New South Wales, assisting the Justices with a range of criminal and civil matters. She was admitted as a Solicitor and Barrister of the New South Wales Supreme Court in 2007. 

In late 2007, Kristi moved to the United Kingdom, completing an MPhil in Criminological Research at the University of Cambridge.  Her research concerned the Students for a Democratic Society, or SDS, a radical US movement of the 1960s and precursor to the Weathermen / Weather Underground.

Kristi's interests include group and organizational behaviour, security, social control, desistance, radicalization and radical movements.  She is an expert on current counter-ideological legislation, as well as WWII and Cold War ideologies and counter-ideological methods.

Kristi's prizes and scholarships in Criminology and Law include the Wakefield Scholarship 2007-2008, a Cambridge Commonwealth Trust Bursary 2007 - 2008, the Tuh Fuh and Ruby Lee Memorial Prize in Law, the JH McClemens Memorial Prize in Criminology, the Sybil Morrison Prize for Jurisprudence, and an Australian Institute of Criminology Research Internship, Canberra, 2005.

Kristi is a Wingate Scholar for 2009 - 2012, the Wingate Scholarship generously supporting Kristi's DPhil research at Oxford.

Kristi lectures in the Law of Evidence, Criminal Behaviour Analysis, Advanced Criminal Justice Theory and Application, Criminal Law, Criminological Theory, and Research Methods for a prominent international University.

She has presented papers on counter-ideology and counter-terrorism, as well as upon various legal and jurisdictional matters under the Australian and UK legislative framework, at conferences in Barcelona, Quebec, Stockholm, Sheffield, and most recently presented on her current research in Singapore at the International Conference on Community Engagement (ICCE), September 2011. 

Her work at Oxford concerns British WWII efforts regarding Control Council denazification and the ideological re-education of Axis Prisoners of War.

Kristi's research and professional associations include: the Cambridge University Intelligence Committee (Cambridge); the Oxford Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War; the Oxford University Strategic Studies Group; the Oxford Intelligence Group; Brasenose Lessons in Government Seminar Series; the Public International Law Discussion Group; the Cambridge Union; the Commonwealth Society (Cambridge); and the Glanville Williams Society, Jesus College (Cambridge).

An inveterate traveller, Kristi most recently returned from a road trip from Istanbul to the Monastery of Saint Catherine in the Sinai, journeying through the forts of Aleppo and Krak Des Chevaliers, and spending time with the Bedouin in Jordan's magnificent Wadi Rum, where she reacquainted herself with mansaf and the correct way to guide an obstreperous camel across the desert.



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Matthew Davies
DPhil Criminology

Green Templeton College


Matthew Davies will be pursuing his DPhil under the supervision of Ian Loader. He intends to examine the impact of Elected Police and Crime Commissioners, set to be introduced across England and Wales in 2012. His study will monitor the way in which the policy unfolds in practice and will explore the broader theoretical implications with regard to police governance and accountability.

Matthew completed an MPhil in Criminology at the University of Cambridge, Wolfson College. Prior to this, he received a first class BA degree in Criminology at the University of Leeds, where he also worked as an advisor at the university's legal advice clinic. During his third year, Matthew spent a year studying at Carleton University, Ottawa.

Aside from his interest in policing, Matthew has enjoyed various experience in other aspects of criminology. Whilst in Canada, Matthew worked for Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA), assisting the reintegration of offenders back into the community. Subsequently, his undergraduate dissertation focused on the release of elderly prisoners and was published in the Internet Journal of Criminology. Whilst at Cambridge, Matthew additionally became interested in crime prevention under the supervision of David Farrington and completed research relating to the effects of street lighting on crime. Outside of these interests, Matthew plays a wide variety of sport and represented Wolfson College's football first team. He also enjoys the great outdoors, travelling and volunteering.



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Sophie Eser
DPhil Law

Keble College

Research interests: prisons, privatisation, sociology of punishment, masculinity, self-governance, criminal justice

Sophie Eser read law at Keble College, Oxford continuing to the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the Centre for Criminology. Her doctoral work, under the supervision of Dr Mary Bosworth explores, through empirical study life in prison for men in two private prisons in England with a paricular focus on ideas of responsibility and self-governance.

Between 2012-13 Sophie was Research Fellow in Detention and The Rule of Law at The British Institute of International and Comparative Law (Bingham Centre) working with Michael Fordham QC and Justine Stefanelli on the Nuffield Foundation Funded research project considering 'Immigration Detention and The Rule of Law' which culminated in an extensive report, launched at The Royal Courts of Justice, on international standards and legal protections in immigration detention ((2013)  'Immigration Detention and the Rule of Law', BIICL, London). Sophie was Stipendiary Lecturer in Law and Graduate Admissions Coordinator at Balliol College, Oxford between 2009-2010 and was previousl Lecturer in Law at The University of Buckingham. In addition she served as Junior Dean at Keble College, Oxford between 2008-2009. Sophie's wider teaching and research interests include criminal and family law, prisons and immigration detention and in particular the privatisation of criminal justice services.



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Andrew Faull
DPhil Criminology

Linacre College


Andrew Faull

Under the supervision of Prof. Ian Loader and Dr. Jonny Steinberg, Andrew's doctoral research explores the question, ‘Who do South African police officers think they are and how does this shape police practice?’  His fieldwork involved eight months of participant observation with police at four police stations in South Africa.

Before moving to Oxford Andrew was employed as a Researcher in the Crime & Justice Programme at the Institute for Security Studies (ISS), a policy research institute with offices across Africa. At the ISS he was lead researcher on a three-year project exploring police corruption and integrity management in the South African Police Service (SAPS). During that time he published numerous articles, papers and co-authored a monograph on the subject, and helped drive related policy reform. He was a regular public commentator on police related matters and presented papers and inputs at various workshops, seminars and conferences. He was promoted to Senior Researcher shortly before leaving for Oxford.

Andrew holds BA, BsocSc(Hons) and Mphil degrees from the University of Cape Town and has spent time as a visitor at New York University. In addition to his ISS publications, Andrew has authored a monograph on diversity training in the SAPS, and a book sketching the working lives of twenty-eight SAPS officials. His more recent publications have explored emerging discourses around ‘police professionalism’ in South Africa, violence and legitimacy in the SAPS, and the monitoring and evaluation of investigations conducted by South Africa's Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID). He has worked as a volunteer police constable (reservist) in Cape Town and Pretoria, serves as a sub-editor for the SA Crime Quarterly and is a member of The Judicalis Group.

His time at Oxford is made possible through the very generous support of the Oppenheimer Memorial Trust (OMT), South Africa's National Research Foundation (NRF), and the Ruth and Nevil Mott Scholarship, for which he is very grateful.



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Michelle Grossman
DPhil Law

Linacre College


Michelle Grossman holds two Masters Degrees, one in Criminology and the other in Social Work, both from The University of Toronto in Canada. For three years following completion of the MA in Criminology, Michelle worked with Professor Anthony Doob at the Centre of Criminology at The University of Toronto as a Research Officer. During this time she also worked as a Researcher in the Forensic Division at the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry in Toronto. Following completion of the MSW degree, she worked at Toronto Child Abuse Centre (TCAC - now known as BOOST), an NGO in Toronto, as Manager of two of the Agency?s clinical programmes, one working with child victims of sexual abuse, the other, working with adult male sex offenders in a relapse prevention programme. After five years at TCAC, Michelle moved to Ottawa to assume a position with the Canadian Federal Government?s Department of Justice. For three years she worked for the Research and Statistics Division as the Senior Research Officer leading the research agenda for the Department?s Policy Centre for Victim Issues. She followed this with one year at the Canadian Department of Public Safety (formerly Solicitor General Canada). Michelle's doctoral research, under the supervision of Professor Andrew Ashworth, involves crime victims and international criminal law.



photo of Rudina Jasini

Rudina Jasini
DPhil Law

Green Templeton College

Research interests: International Criminal Law Public International Law Human Rights Law

Rudina Jasini

 

Rudina Jasini is reading for a DPhil in Law. Her doctoral research centres on the participation of victims of mass atrocities as partie civile in international criminal proceedings. She has completed a Visiting Researcher programme both at Harvard Law School (2013) and at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law (2012). Rudina has taught tutorials in Public International Law and International Criminal Law at New College and Christ Church at Oxford University. Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked for the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague as a legal officer on the Defence Team in the case of Haradinaj et al. In March 2009, she worked pro bono with the legal team providing representation and assistance to victims of Khmer Rouge regime, in the prosecution of Kaing Geuk Eav (a/k/a Duch).

Rudina holds an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Oxford (2009), an LL.M. in International Legal Studies from Georgetown University Law Center (2006) and a B.A. in Law from the University of Tirana (2001).



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Anna Kotova
DPhil Criminology

Green Templeton College

Research interests: prisoners' families, social justice, imprisonment, gender

Anna Kotova

Anna graduated with a BA in Law (First Class) from Oriel College, University of Oxford. She then achieved an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice (Distinction) from the Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford. It is during the MSc course that her interest in prisoners' families and the collateral impact of imprisonment developed. Building on her MSc work on the stigma and shame experienced by female partners of male sex offenders, Anna is now undertaking D.Phil research on the impact of imprisonment on partners of long-term prisoners. This research is supervised by Dr. Rachel Condry and is funded by the Sir Halley Stewart Trust.

Anna teaches Criminal Law at Oriel College and is involved in Law Admissions. She also teaches the Law Preparation course at the Oxford Royale Academy Summer School.

 


 

Current Research:

"Making Love Last: Maintaining Intimate Relationships with Long-term Prisoners"

This research seeks to engage directly with female partners (wives, girlfriends and fiancees) of male prisoners serving a determinate sentence of 10 years or more (i.e. 5 years served in prison) in the UK, or an IPP or life-sentence. Using in-depth interviews, the research seeks to explore how these partners are affected by long-term imprisonment and the mechanisms they use to cope with the numerous emotional, financial and social difficulties.

I am currently looking for participants to interview - if you think you might be willing to talk to me about your experiences, please contact me on 07884060023 or anna.kotova@gtc.ox.ac.uk

All interviews are confidential and conducted at a place and time convenient to you.




photo of Richard Martin

Richard Martin
DPhil Criminology

New College

Research interests: Policing; Human Rights Law and Practice; Legitimacy; Northern Ireland; Public Law; Law of Evidence

Richard Martin

Richard is returning to the Centre for Criminology to embark on doctoral research analyzing human rights law and practice within the police, and its connection with police legitimacy, within post-conflict Northern Ireland. The project is genersouly funded by the ESRC and enjoys the benefit of supervision by Dr Ben Bradford and Dr John Topping (University of Ulster), as well as the intellectual stimulation offered by the academic community at the Centre for Criminology.

Criminal justice, and the connected legal issues, within Northern Ireland are an area which Richard had been interested throughout his studies, having worked on issues including: allegations of state collusion in high profile deaths, the use of court proceedings by victims of the conflict and their families, and the prosecution of local terrorist organizations. Throughout his law degree Richard has spent valuable time with the Committee on the Administration of Justice (Belfast), as well as the Northern Irish Departmental Solicitor’s Office, the Department of Justice and Legal Services for the Stormont Assembly. He continues to have an interest in public law, human rights law and the law of evidence.

During the first year of his DPhil, Richard has been a researcher on an ambitious project to investigate the ways in which mounted police work is experienced in the UK, funded by the ESRC and run in conjunction with RAND and the Association of Chief Police Officers. He has also been involved as an advisor and co-writer for two research projects into police confidence in Northern Ireland, led by lecturers at University of Ulster and funded by the Northern Ireland Policing Board. 

Richard graduated with first class honours in Law from the University of Bristol and was the recipient of the Oxford University Press Prize for achieving the top mark in the Crime, Justice and Society course. Arriving at the Oxford Centre for Criminology in 2012 to study for the MSc. in Criminology and Criminal Justice, he has recently graduated with distinction and had the pleasure of receiving the Roger Hood Prize, awarded for coming first in his year. 



photo of George Mawhinney

George Mawhinney
DPhil Law

Oriel College

Teaches: Criminology and Criminal Justice

Research interests: Criminal justice Criminal law Criminology Constitutional principles and policy

George Mawhinney

George came to the Centre for Criminology in the Faculty of Law originally back in 2008 for the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice. After an immensely enlightening and enjoyable year, he was elated to return in Michaelmas 2010 to commence the MSt in Legal Research under the supervision of Prof Andrew Ashworth. Having now progressed onto the DPhil, his doctoral thesis builds upon the investigation first conducted for his MSc dissertation in a fast-moving, crucially important dimension of contemporary sentencing law. It applies the principles of desert theory to the practice of sentencing in the UK in the light of Sch. 21 to the Criminal Justice Act 2003. He is also interested in criminal law, criminology, and criminal justice broadly defined. Outside his studies, he is keenly interested in politics and history, inter alia.



photo of Shona Minson

Shona Minson
DPhil Criminology

Wadham College & Oxford Human Rights Hub

Research interests: women's imprisonment, children of prisoners, criminal sentencing policy, rights of the child

Shona Minson

 

After graduating from St.Anne's College, Oxford in Jurisprudence Shona was called to the Bar of England and Wales and practised criminal and family law from 1 King's Bench Walk, London. Her professional experience has led to her research interest in the points of intersection between family and criminal law. Shona is undertaking ESRC funded DPhil research on the impact of short term maternal imprisonment on children, supervised by Dr Rachel Condry and Professor Julian Roberts. The research explores the status of children of prisoners in English law and whether current sentencing policy protects children from 'all forms of discrimination or punishment on the basis of the status or activities.. of the child's parents' ( Article 2 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child ). The research will engage directly with children and their carers to explore the nature of the impact of maternal imprisonment, and with the judiciary to examine sentencing practice. This research builds on previous research Shona undertook when obtaining an MSc (Distinction)  from the University of Surrey in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Social Research. Her Masters research explored  the impact of motherhood as mitigation in criminal sentencing through qualitative interviews with members of the judiciary and an analysis of sentencing transcripts. Shona is part of the I-Hop Academic/ workforce development task force. I-Hop is an initiative of Barnardo's and the Department of Education to bring together resources and those with an active interest in the children of prisoners.

Her report on 'Motherhood as Mitigation' won the John Sunley Prize 2013 and was published by The Howard League for Penal Reform in April 2014. The link to download is available below.

 

Study on the impact of maternal imprisonment on children : Call for Participants 

I would like to meet with children whose Mum is in prison to find out about their experiences and what it has been like for them. I would also like to speak with their carers. Below are extracts from my information booklet for younger children, explaining a little more about what I would ask of them. 

 

All interviews will be confidential and will be conducted at a time and place convenient to the participants. The study has received ethical approval from the University of Oxford and is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. 

If you know of anyone who may be interested in participating or you would like more information, please contact me on shona.minson@crim.ox.ac.uk 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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Alice Reid
DPhil Criminology

St Cross College




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Sylvia Rich
DPhil Law

Balliol College

Research interests: criminal law theory, jurisprudence, organizational crime

Sylvia Rich

My DPhil explores the moral agency of corporations through the lens of criminal law. This work is being completed under the co-supervision of Professors John Gardner and Julian Roberts. I'm a graduate of McGill law and a former law clerk to Justice Ian Binnie at the Supreme Court of Canada. This year I taught undergraduate jurisprudence at Christ Church College.



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Lea Sitkin
DPhil Criminology

Green Templeton College


Lea Sitkin came to the Centre for Criminology in October 2010, having completed her MSc in Comparative Social Policy (Research) at Oxford University that same year. She was awarded a distinction overall for her Masters and for her dissertation, which looked at the relationship between economic insecurity and punitive social/penal policy. Lea is currently working under the supervision of Dr. Mary Bosworth and Prof. Nicola Lacey. Building on her previous interest in the political economy of punishment, her thesis looks at the way in which the measures, politics and impacts of policy measures criminalising migrants (in particular, migrant workers) differ across the varieties of capitalism. To this end, Lea will be conducting extensive field work in the UK and in Germany next year. Outside of her thesis, Lea volunteers as a detention support worker for detainees at a local detention centre. She is also looking forward to conducting research on poverty, social exclusion and social cohesion in London this summer.



photo of Marie Tidball

Marie Tidball
DPhil Criminology

Wadham College


Marie Tidball

After reading her BA in Jurisprudence (Law) at Wadham College, Marie did a year's journalism traineeship at Channel 4 News before returning to Oxford to do the MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice - for which she obtained a distinction. Her MSc dissertation 'Mad, Bad or Disabled?' looked at the importance of developing a coherent disability perspective in Criminology for the governance of offenders with learning disabilities and mental health problems (LD&MHP) in England and Wales. Arguing Lord Bradley's Report (2009) made this theoretical venture all the more pertinent, Anti-social Behaviour Orders were used as a practical case-study of the application of such a disability perspective since they have posed a particular problem for perpetrators with LD&MHP. This study received a top first class mark and led her to work as Policy and Legal Officer at Autism West Midlands. Here she co-ordinated and produced a number of consultation responses to national and local government consultations including the Autism Statutory Guidance Implementing fulfilling and rewarding lives (see DH, 2010) and Birmingham City Council's A Vision for Adult Social Care (see, 2010). Gaining insight into the application of the Big Society in practice and knowledge of the changes in Local Government, Health and Adult Social Care (see Localism Bill 2010-11; Health and Social Care Bill 2010-11; DH, 2010) and the interaction of these changes with the English Criminal Justice System, her role inspired her to return to Oxford to pursue the DPhil in Criminology. Marie received an ESRC +3 Studentship and began her DPhil in October 2011 under the supervision of Dr Carolyn Hoyle. Her thesis explores the governance of offenders with Autistic Spectrum Conditions in the English Criminal Justice System. Marie's wider interests include administrative law, the role of elite decision-makers in the criminal justice system, restorative justice, victimology and the relationship between politics, the media and criminal justice policy.



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Leila Ullrich
DPhil Criminology

Hertford College & Oxford Transitional Justice Research & Oxford Law Faculty

Research interests: Transitional Justice, International Criminal Justice, Criminology, Victimology, Human Rights, International Relations, Law and Society, Global Civil Society

Leila Ullrich

Leila’s research interests are the construction and use of justice concepts and practices at international criminal justice institutions and, more broadly, the interplay between international criminal justice, transitional justice and civil society organizations. Her doctoral thesis addresses the question of how the concept of "justice for victims" is interpreted, used and implemented by the different justice stakeholders of the International Criminal Court (ICC) with focus on victim participation in Kenya and victim assistance in Uganda. Her research is supervised by Professor Carolyn Hoyle. Leila’s MSc and DPhil studies in Oxford are funded by a 1+3 Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) studentship.

Leila is the External Relations Officer and Working Paper Series General Editor of the Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR) group, an inter-disciplinary research network of more than 150 Oxford staff and students working broadly on issues of transitional justice in societies recovering from mass conflict and/or repressive rule.

She has worked at the International Criminal Court (ICC), the German Mission to the United Nations in New York, the Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF) and the German Parliament (Bundestag). 



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Marion Vannier
DPhil Criminology

Green Templeton College

Research interests: International Criminal Law, Refugee Law, Human Rights Law, Criminology, Death Penalty, Sentencing.

Marion Vannier

Prior to reading for her Dphil, Marion completed a joint LLB (King’s College London) and French Maîtrise de droit (Université Paris I PanthéonLa Sorbonne) (with Honors), an LL.M in International legal studies at Georgetown University Law Center, Washington D.C (with Honors and Dean's List), and a M.Sc in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Oxford (with Distinction). These studies gave Marion the opportunity to specialize in international law, human rights and refugee laws, and war crime related issues.

Upon completion of her studies and passing the New York and Paris bars, Marion worked for four years at Linklaters LLP and White & Case LLP on various areas of international law. She then seized an opportunity to work as legal officer on a Defence team before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (Tanzania). Upon her return in France, Marion was hired as a judge (Juge assesseur) for the UNHCR within the French Asylum appeals court (Cour Nationale de Droit d'Asile). Marion decided to build on these international legal experiences to redirect her career towards academia, leading her to start a D.Phil in criminology at Oxford. 

Marion's research project is supervised by Professor Mary Bosworth and Professor Carolyn Hoyle. In 2014, she will be a Visiting Scholar at UC Berkeley under Professor Jonathan Simon's supervison. She is most grateful for the financial assistance from the Paris Bar, the Rotary Club, a French trust fund, the Oxford Faculty of Law and Green Templeton College. From January 2014, Marion will serve as the editorial assistant for Theoretical Criminology



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Gabrielle Watson
DPhil Criminology

Worcester College


Gabrielle Watson embarked upon her doctoral research at Oxford in October 2012 under the supervision of Professor Ian Loader. Her work is concerned with the construction of a case for the feasibility of ‘respect’ as a new analytic category in contemporary criminal justice. Gabrielle’s research is supported by an ESRC doctoral scholarship, for which she would like to express her gratitude.

Gabrielle holds an LL.B with First Class Honours from Edinburgh Law School and an M.Sc in Criminology and Criminal Justice with Distinction from the University of Oxford. At Oxford, she was awarded the Roger Hood Prize for the best performance in the 2012 Examination.

In addition to her doctoral research, most recently Gabrielle has provided research and editorial assistance to Professors Andrew Ashworth, Julian Roberts and Lucia Zedner in the production of two major Oxford University Press criminal law edited collections (both 2013) and assisted Dr Jane Donoghue in the organisation of an International Symposium on Therapeutic Jurisprudence at Balliol College, Oxford (2012).

In October 2013, Gabrielle will be elected to the Martin Senior Scholarship at Worcester College, Oxford.



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Kate West
DPhil Criminology

Research interests: visual criminology, visual culture, law and aesthetics, feminist theory (Luce Irigaray), continental philosophy (Emmanuel Levinas).

Kate West

I am an interdisciplinary researcher who works between criminology, visual culture, and philosophy. 

In my doctoral research I critically assess how visual representation affects understanding.  My interest is in crime images, specifically ‘mug shots’. I develop my methodology—a feminist (Irigarayian) reading of Emmanuel Levinas’s Totality and Infinity—from the mug shot’s place in a history of visual culture. My method allows me to interpret and re-present thirty-two mug shots sourced from the National Records Scotland in a way that renders visible the manner in which such images represent individuals and changes the way, as viewers, we could look and think about them.

My research is supervised by Mary Bosworth and is financially supported by an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) 1+3 studentship. I have an LLB (First Class Honours) from the University of Edinburgh and MSc (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. 

 

 



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Roxana Willis
DPhil Law

St Edmund Hall


Roxana Willis




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